The three wise monkeys in Nikko

Nikko - Photo: Simon Tsuruta Pedersen

The monkey may symbolize the human mind; clever and intelligent but also prone to mischief…

“The three wise monkeys” is one of eight wood carved panels depicting monkeys on the Toshogu shrine in Nikko, a few hours north of Tokyo in Japan. The iconic monkeys are popularly known to represent the idea that one should “see no evil, hear no evil and speak no evil”. The original philosophy behind these principles could date as far back as to Confucius’s time and his code of conduct. The Toshogu shrine, however, is a Shinto shrine with Buddhist elements built in the 17th century. Buddhism from China and native Japanese Shintoism had long since been vital forces in the forming of the Japanese culture. Using the monkey as a symbol, especially in Buddhist imagery, was quite common up until that time. A monkey may protect against evil spirits, or it may symbolize the human mind; clever and intelligent but also prone to mischief and restlessness.

Toshogu Shrine

The Toshogu Shrine was inscribed on the World Heritage list in 1999 together with the Futarasan-jinja, both Shinto shrines, and the Buddhist temple Rinnô-ji. These sacred sites, situated in beautiful surroundings in Nikko, are considered outstanding examples of a traditional Japanese religious complex. They reflect the close relationship of man with nature, a perception that lies at the heart of Shintoism in particular and of Japanese culture in general.

Nikko - Photo: Simon Tsuruta Pedersen

Toshogu Shrine (main building) – Photo: Simon Tsuruta Pedersen

 

Nikko - Photo: Simon Tsuruta Pedersen

Toshogu Shrine (detail) – Photo: Simon Tsuruta Pedersen

 

 

SOURCES & CREDITS
All photos including header photo courtesy of Simon Tsuruta Pedersen.
This article was first published Apr.30. 2015.